Intro.

You are now entering the Bapt’cave. Welcome.
Roll a blunt, take a Whisky… Do what you want but, please, chill!

Don’t be surprised if you see me posting a VANESSA PARADIS 7″ or LEMURIA , MINDBENDER/Stringtronics, CELIA , GANDALF , THEATRE WEST , ROBERT CHARLEBOIS et LOUISE FORESTIER , RAMP , GAINSBOURG , SUN RA , JEAN GABIN , NEWBAN , THE STOOGES , FRANCOIS JEANNEAU , ZAPPA , TOSHIKI KADOMATSU , CAPTAIN BEEFHEART , NICO , JEANNE MOREAU , HAL GALPER , ROD , CORTEX, MOVING GELATINE PLATES , CESAR MARIANO & Cia , THE ANDREW SISTERS , ROY BUDD , KENNY BURRELL , GERARD MANSET , CECIL MC BEE , STEVE WARING , BERNARD LUBAT , MYSTIC MERLIN , FUTURE FLIGHT, NARA LEÀO … to PAUL BLEY, just to name a few.
It’s just about Music!

— PAUL BLEY – Improvisie —

The name of my cave is a reference to PAUL BLEY.
He recorded an album called “Improvisie” released on America Records in 1971.

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Photo : HORACE

From the back cover :

PAUL BLEY, a revolutionary musician. With the debut of be-bop he accompanied CHARLIE PARKER, BREW MOORE, ALLEN EAGER among others, recorded with CHARLES MINGUS and ART BLAKEY, and replaced OSCAR PETERSON in his own trio.
In the musical revolution that was Free Jazz in 1958, he was at the head of the fabulous Hilcrest Club Quintet in L.A. with ORNETTE COLEMAN, DON CHERRY, CHARLIE HADEN and BILLY HIGGINS. In 1964, he participated in the “October Revolution” of the Jazz Composer’s Guild, when he played with ARCHIE SHEPP, JOHN TCHICAI, and headed a quintet which comprised MARSHALL ALLEN (altist of SUN RA) and MILFORD GRAVES, certainly the most important percussionnist in the history of the “New Thing”.

1967 – Electronic Revolution – “New York is a funny place. It’s really a drag in many ways. Just when you think you’ve got something and are able to relax a little while, there are changes and you’re an amateur again… When we came to N.Y. in 1967, the new thing was electronics and I realized that I was an amateur again, that I knew nothing about it, and that I had two alternatives to take. One is that I could become a very beautiful musician within a idiom, saying that electronic music was another generation, or I could become an amateur again.”

We tend, in fact, to regard these revolutions in the structure of Jazz as emmanating from some whim or fancy of an individual musician. Indeed each time the music of COLTRANE took a sudden plunge in a different direction, weren’t these very same objections offered? But, in listening to the collective works of his Canadian pianist, we find to the contrary, that each revolution in Jazz responded to a real stylistic need to infuse his music with a new richness rendering each successive record more moving and for some, more complicated than the preceding one.

BLEY’s first piano versions of “Touching”, for example, sound strangely classical, though not outmoded, while the version on the present album is purely in the realm of a vivid mental trip, aided by his sensitive use of electronics and by the sensual voice and words of ANNETTE PEACOCK.

The use of timing in this album constitutes another revolution in music and the acceptance of this is the only possible way to effect a total involvment in the perverse paradise created by BLEY, PEACOCK and BENNINK. For the torturous yet thrilling distorsion of sound, ANNETTE PEACOCK and HAN BENNINK are at least as much responsible as the leader himself.

The strength of PAUL BLEY lies not only in his refusal to find security in the shelter of what he has already created, but in his continual openness to the most inspired and yet most destructive musicians on the Jazz scene. This record gives us an almost magical and pracarious balance of three tremendously creative forces of our era. Only a deaf man could ignore it.

by LAURENT GODDET

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Photo : PHILIPPE GRAS

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